Modularity Projects

Scroll down to see all Modularity projects, or click to the right to view each individually and to see sample student work.

Download project brief:

LINKED_Introduction

LINKED_workflow

LINKED_specs

Linked

1. Chose a word as your theme and create an outline template in Illustrator. Set the final pixel dimensions of the motion graphic, as well as the size and placement of each letter module.

2. Assign a team of participants for each letter.

3. Give each participant a letter template, and ask him or her to make a two-second motion sequence of that letter. Participants must keep the fixed size of their module, and the letter must start and end in the position indicated on the template.

4. When all letters are completed, edit them in After Effects to create one large animated piece. Add original, student-created sound.

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Contributed by Zvezdana Stojmirovic, Maryland Institute College of Art and Helen Armstrong, Miami University

See p. 77 of Participate for sample student work.

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Download Project Brief: Modules_at_Play

Modules at Play

1.  Draw a shape that can easily be repeated.

2. Make twelve copies of your shape. Hand-cut them
yourself or use a laser cutter.

3. Display your shapes in a user-friendly way and let an audience arrange and rearrange them.

4. Document various arrangements throughout the duration of your exhibition.

5. Use Adobe Flash to create a ten-second animation, showing the different ways in which your module
can repeat.

Contributed by Zvezdana Stojmirovic, Maryland Institute College of Art

See p. 80 and 81 of Participate for sample student work

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Download Project Brief: lettersplice

Letter Splice

1. Pick a classic serif typeface.

2. Examine the different parts of the characters. Notice that each typeface is broken into the same twenty-one parts, including ascender, descender, crossbar, bowl, counter, and terminal, etc.

3. Visit typeisart.com to see a description of each part and play around with this site for a bit.
Return to your chosen typeface and dissect it into the twenty-one parts in Illustrator.

4. Using these parts, create a family of three icons.

5. All three icons should have a common theme (for example: faces, animals, lamps, seasons) and a
similar look and feel.

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Contributed by Helen Armstrong, Maryland Institute College of Art

See p. 80 of Participate for sample student work.

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Download Project Brief:TypeBits1

Download grid templates:
typebits_grids_2011_circle1


typebits_grids_2011_square1

Type Bits

1. Pick a random text message from your cell phone.

2. Using office supply labels (squares, circles, or rectangles), construct modular letters that spell
out the message.

3. Convert the letterforms into vector graphics using the Live Trace command in Adobe Illustrator.
Arrange the letters into a full lowercase font.

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Contributed by Helen Armstrong, Maryland Institute College of Art

See p. 79 of Participate for sample student work.

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Sustain Yourself

1. Pick a theme.

2. Engage a team of participants to develop a sample chapter, creating a master InDesign document with pagination and a template for the group to use.

3. Charge each member of the group to develop content for one chapter of the book.

4. Give guidance as members start designing their chapters using the template provided. Save them as pdfs.

5. Import all pdfs into the InDesign master document and publish the book using an on-demand printer.
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Contributed by Zvezdana Stojmirovic, Maryland Institute College of Art

See p. 76  of Participate for sample student work.

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